Spin [1995]

 

Pirated satellite feeds revealing U.S. media personalities’ contempt for their viewers come full circle in Spin. TV out-takes appropriated from network satellite feeds unravel the tightly-spun fabric of television—a system that silences public debate and enforces the exclusion of anyone outside the pack of journalists, politicians, spin doctors, and televangelists who manufacture the news. Spin moves through the L.A. riots and the floating TV talk-show called the 1992 U.S. presidential election.

A Conversation on Privacy With Edward Snowden, Noam Chomsky, and Glenn Greenwald

 

NSA WHISTLEBLOWER Edward Snowden joined MIT professor Noam Chomsky and The Intercept’s Glenn Greenwald on Friday for a discussion on privacy rights hosted by the University of Arizona College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. The panel was moderated by Nuala O’Connor, the president of the Center for Democracy and Technology.

The panel marked Snowden’s first public appearance after the terror attacks in Brussels. Commenting on Belgium’s intelligence failures, he referenced New York Times reporting that Belgian authorities ignored a tip from Turkish intelligence. “When you collect everything, you understand nothing … you’re blinded by the noise,” Snowden said. “I worked at that desk, I used the tools of mass surveillance.”

(…)

https://theintercept.com/2016/03/30/edward-snowden-noam-chomsky-glenn-greenwald-a-conversation-on-privacy/

John Pilger on Iraq and Terrorism

An excerpt from an interview with distinguished campaigning journalist John Pilger, for the forthcoming Media Workers Against the War Conference ‘THE FIRST CASUALTY? War, Truth & the Media Today’, at the London School of Economics on November 17th, 2007.

Glenn Greenwald on Canada, the surveillance state and the future of the internet

In Montreal this October for a series of speaking engagements, Glenn Greenwald sat down with Ricochet Editor Ethan Cox for a feature interview touching on the role of Canada in the state surveillance exposed by Snowden, the best and worst case scenarios for the future of the internet and the trouble with the term terrorism.

 

The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz

The film follows the story of programming prodigy and information activist Aaron Swartz. From Swartz’s help in the development of the basic internet protocol RSS to his co-founding of Reddit, his fingerprints are all over the internet. But it was Swartz’s groundbreaking work in social justice and political organizing combined with his aggressive approach to information access that ensnared him in a two-year legal nightmare. It was a battle that ended with the taking of his own life at the age of 26. Aaron’s story touched a nerve with people far beyond the online communities in which he was a celebrity. This film is a personal story about what we lose when we are tone deaf about technology and its relationship to our civil liberties.

Inside The Dark Web

BBC Documentary. Twenty-five years after the World Wide Web was created, the issue of surveillance has become the greatest controversy of its existence. With many concerned that governments and corporations can monitor people’s every move, this program meets hackers and scientists who are using technology to fight back, as well as the law enforcement officers who believe it’s leading to opportunities for risk-free crimes. With contributors including World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee and WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange.