Manufacturing Consent – Noam Chomsky and the Media

Manufacturing Consent: Noam Chomsky and the Media (1992) is a documentary film that explores the political life and ideas of Noam Chomsky, a linguist, intellectual, and political activist. Created by two Canadian filmmakers, Mark Achbar and Peter Wintonick, it expands on the ideas of Chomsky’s earlier book, Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media, which he co-wrote with Edward S. Herman.

The film presents and illustrates Chomsky’s and Herman’s thesis that corporate media, as profit-driven institutions, tend to serve and further the agendas of the interests of dominant, elite groups in the society. A centerpiece of the film is a long examination of the history of The New York Times’ coverage of the Indonesian occupation of East Timor, which Chomsky says exemplifies the media’s unwillingness to criticize an ally of the elite.

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The Myth of the Liberal Media

Destroying the myth of the “liberal media,” the documentary shows how corporate interests influence the news coverage of key events.
Production: Media Education Foundation

“If you want to understand the way a system works, you look at its institutional structure. How it is organized, how it is controlled, how it is funded.” -Noam Chomsky

“The Mainstream media really represent elite interests, and what the propaganda model tries to do is stipulate a set of institutional variables, reflecting this elite power, that very powerfully influence the media.” -Edward Herman

For some quality fiction about this reality, see: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0473705